Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2020 Energy and Water Development Funding Bill

May 14, 2019
Press Release
Legislation invests $46.4 billion in Energy and Water Development programs, an increase of $1.8 billion from fiscal year 2019, addressing climate change, improving infrastructure, and upholding our commitment to strengthening national security

WASHINGTON — The House Appropriations Committee today released the draft fiscal year 2020 Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies funding bill, which will be considered in subcommittee on Wednesday, May 15, 2019. The legislation funds the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Interior programs, the Department of Energy, and other related agencies.

 

In total, the legislation includes $46.4 billion in funding to spur energy innovation that will increase economic prosperity while working to mitigate and adapt to climate change, improve the nation’s water infrastructure, and strengthen national security. This represents an increase of $1.8 billion, or 4 percent, above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. The bill includes $23.3 billion for non-defense activities, an increase of $1.1 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level, and $23.1 billion for defense spending, an increase of $673 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.

 

“Funding innovative programs at the Department of Energy and the jobs that comes from them, shoring up our energy and water infrastructure to bolster trade, and promoting a comprehensive approach to the challenges of one of our most precious resources, fresh water, have been among my highest priorities as Chairwoman,” said House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Chairwoman Marcy Kaptur. “This bill makes critical investments toward combating climate change, strengthening our nation’s water infrastructure, responsibly funding our nuclear deterrent, and providing robust funding to help ensure low-income households across the country have energy-efficient and more livable homes. This bill ensures a credible nuclear deterrent and increases funding for nuclear nonproliferation programs. This bill rejects the President’s drastic, short-sighted cuts across the Department of Energy, Army Corps of Engineers, and the Bureau of Reclamation – all of which contribute to our nation’s economic prosperity. These investments keep our nation at the forefront of global energy innovation, enable American companies to ship goods efficiently, and provide water and electricity to tens of millions of Americans. At its heart, the Energy and Water Appropriations Bill is an infrastructure and climate bill that ensures the continued strength of the Americans economy in a changing world.”

 

“Recent natural disasters have made undeniably clear the need to invest in robust water infrastructure that is more resilient to future storms,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey. “Just as important is investing in clean energy technologies that are environmentally sound and economically advantageous. This bill meets these priorities, reaffirming our nation’s leadership on energy innovation and ensuring hardworking families have the resources needed to meet their own energy needs. Additionally, the bill makes smart investments in our national security by maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent while addressing threats of proliferation.”

 

A summary of the draft fiscal year 2020 Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies bill is below. The full text of the bill is here. The subcommittee markup will be webcast live and linked from https://appropriations.house.gov/events/markups.

 

Bill Summary:

Army Corps of Engineers – The bill provides a total of $7.36 billion, an increase of $357 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $2.53 billion above the budget request.

  • Funding for Investigations is $135 million, an increase of $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $58 million above the request.
  • Funding for Construction is $2.34 billion, an increase of $154 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $1.17 billion above the request.
  • Funding for Operation and Maintenance is $3.92 billion, an increase of $183.5 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $1.99 billion above the request.
  • Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund projects receive $1.697 billion, $147 million above the fiscal year 2019 level, an increase of $732 million above the request and $100 million above target set by the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014.
  • The bill makes full use of the estimated receipts for the Inland Waterways Trust Fund.
  • The bill provides for six new study starts and six new construction projects.

 

Department of the Interior/Bureau of Reclamation – The bill provides a total of $1.65 billion for the Department, an increase of $82.8 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $528 million above the President’s budget request.

  • The bill provides $15 million for the Central Utah Project, the same as the fiscal year 2019 level and an increase of $5 million above the request.
  • The bill provides $1.63 billion for the Bureau of Reclamation, an increase of $82.8 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $523 million above the request. Within Reclamation:
    • The bill provides $400 million in additional funding for water resources projects, including those authorized in the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act.
    • Within additional funding, $121 million is provided for rural water projects above the budget request.   

 

Department of Energy – The bill provides a total of $37.1 billion for the Department, an increase of $1.4 billion above the fiscal year 2019 level and $5.6 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy – The bill provides $2.65 billion, an increase of $273 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $2.3 billion above the request. This funding provides for clean, affordable, and secure energy and ensures American leadership in the transition to a global clean energy economy.
  • Cybersecurity, Energy Security, and Emergency Response – The bill provides $150 million, an increase of $30 million above the fiscal year 2019 level. This funding provides for efforts to secure the nation’s energy infrastructure against all hazards, reduce the risks of and impacts from cybersecurity events, and assist with restoration activities.
  • Electricity – The bill provides $200 million, an increase of $44 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $17.5 million above the request. This funding will advance technologies to increase the resiliency and efficiency of the nation’s electricity delivery system with capabilities to incorporate growing amounts of clean energy technologies.
  • Nuclear Energy – The bill provides $1.3 billion, an increase of $494 million over the request. The funding invests in research, development, and demonstration activities that develop the next generation of clean and safe reactors, further improve the safety and economic viability of our current reactor fleet and contribute to the nation’s long-term leadership in the global nuclear power industry. Funding is included to begin interim storage activities for spent nuclear fuel.
  • Fossil Energy Research and Development – The bill provides $740 million, equal to the fiscal year 2019 level and an increase of $178 million above the request. This funding provides for research, development, and demonstration activities to ensure the safe, efficient, and environmentally sound use of fossil energy resources.
  • Science – The bill provides $6.87 billion, an increase of $285 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $1.3 billion above the request. The Office of Science funds basic science research in physics, biology, chemistry, and other science disciplines to expand scientific understanding and secure the nation’s global leadership in energy innovation.
  • Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy – The bill provides $425 million, an increase of $59 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and rejects the budget proposal to eliminate the program. This funding supports research aimed at rapidly developing energy technologies that are capable of significantly changing the energy sector to address our critical economic, environmental, and energy security challenges.
  • Indian Energy Policy and Programs – The bill provides $25 million, an increase of 39 percent above the fiscal year 2019 level and $17 million above the request. This funding will provide technical assistance, direct and remote education, policy research and analysis, and financial assistance to Indian tribes, Alaska Native Village and Regional corporations, and Tribal Energy Resource Development Organizations.
  • National Nuclear Security Administration –The bill provides $15.9 billion for DOE’s nuclear security programs, an increase of $665.7 million above the fiscal year 2019 level. This funding will maintain a safe, secure, and credible nuclear deterrent while addressing the threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. This includes:
    • Weapons Activities – $11.76 billion, an increase of $661 million above the fiscal year 2019 level to maintain a credible nuclear deterrent.
    • Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation – $2.07 billion, an increase of $145 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $82 million above the request. This funding secures nuclear material both globally and domestically. Funding is included to advance the Surplus Plutonium Disposition project.
    • Naval Nuclear Reactors – $1.63 billion, which is $160 million below the fiscal year 2019 level, to continue safe and reliable operation of the Navy’s nuclear-powered fleet and consistent with planned reductions as projects near completion.
    • Federal Salaries and Expenses– $430 million, an increase of $20 million above the fiscal year 2019 level, to strengthen federal oversight and program and project management.

 

  • Environmental Management – The bill provides $7.175 billion, equal to the fiscal year 2019 level and an increase of $706 million above the President’s budget request. This funding is used for nuclear waste cleanup at 16 sites across the country.
    • Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup – $308 million, an increase of $61 million above the request.
    • Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning – $873 million, an increase of $32 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and $158 million above the budget request.
    • Defense Environmental Cleanup – $5.994 billion, an increase of $487 million above the request.

 

  • Loan Guarantee Programs – The bill rejects the President’s proposal to eliminate these programs and includes funding consistent with the fiscal year 2019 levels.

 

  • Power Marketing Administrations – The bill provides the budget request levels for the Southeastern Power Administration, Southwestern Power Administration, and Western Area Power Administration. The bill rejects the President’s proposal to sell the transmission assets of the PMAs, change the laws governing how the PMAs establish power rates, and repeal the borrowing authority for the Western Area Power Administration.

 

Nuclear Regulatory Commission – The bill provides a net appropriation of $130 million, which is $95,000 below the fiscal year 2019 level.  This funds regulatory activities to ensure the safe use of nuclear reactors and radioactive materials while protecting people and the environment.

 

Appalachian Regional Commission – The bill provides $170 million, an increase of $5 million above the fiscal year 2019 level and the request. The Commission funds projects in the Appalachian Region to promote economic development, education and job training, critical infrastructure, and community development. This includes $50 million for activities that target resources to help communities and regions that have been affected by the economic downturn of the coal industry.

 

Northern Border Regional Commission – The bill provides $22 million, an increase of 10 percent above the fiscal year 2019 level and $21 million above the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York.

 

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